Intro to Adobe Illustrator

Week 1 – Day 2

Introduction to Adobe Illustrator and Vector Graphics

Ai

Illustrator is part of Adobe’s Creative software suite (now “Creative Cloud”). The primary focus of Illustrator is the use of and creation of vector graphics. Most graphics are rasterized (a grid of pixels with assigned values); vectors are “drawn” by software (or hardware, if supported) and are not limited by resolution. At our university’s Mac lab, we have preloaded versions of Illustrator, here’s a quick run-through:

There are lots of ways to launch the program. My preferred method is to use Spotlight search.

Command+[Spacebar]

This will open a search box (this is like Google for your computer), just start typing “illustrator” and you’ll get an auto-complete before you finish typing it. Just hit Enter when it fills in the remaining characters. BAM! You’re in.

Next, we need to create a new project:

Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 6.13.40 PM

File -> New ->

Name: Lastname-Intro [Geiger-Intro ART119]

Profile: Web

Size: 960 x 560

Units: Pixels

Orientation: Landscape

After creating this new document, save it.

File -> Save ->

Save as: Lastname-Intro.ai [Geiger-Intro-ART119.ai]

Default settings -> OK

Terms:

Artboard

Working area

 

Shape Tool

Used to create a vector object

 

Vector object

            Vector Objects are defined with Paths and Points

 

Stroke

            Defines the thickness of lines (vectors)

 

Fill

            Defines the “filling” of an object (like Twinkies)

 

Arrange

            Illustrator “stacks” objects in the order they were created. To change this order, go to the top menu:

Object -> Arrange -> Send to…(back/front) Bring to (back/front)

Align

            Like with a text editor, aligns an object to different orientations (objects, Artboard, etc.)

 

Keyboard Shortcuts:

Option+LeftClick(on object)+drag

            Drag to new area to create a duplicate

LeftClick+drag(over objects)

            Bounding box selects multiple items

Command+S

            Save current progress

In-class exercise: practice drawing your name. I wrote mine in cyrillic:

Screen Shot 2016-03-30 at 7.00.47 PM

The letter “а” is tricky, and I didn’t quite get it right on the first try (“Матвей Гайгер” The first “a” looks like an “o”). This was all done with the pen tool, but switching back and forth between the curve and straight pen.

Project 1: Typographic Portraits

Timeline:

Mar 30: Project Intro, sketch ideas for next class (blog)

Apr 05: Work time in class following demonstrations

Apr 07: Work Time in class, following demonstrations

Apr 11: Review Typographic Portraits

 

Example: “Eruption” “Tilt-A-Whirl” “Balloon Darts” “Roller Bowler” “Cock Clock” “Exit” “Copernicus”.

 

Choose 3 of 6 provided character prompts. Use your name, first and/or last or nickname. Along with typographic and design…

 

“Hello my name is______ and I’m…”

 

Due Monday:

Sketches and ideas for project

Reflection on Open House (Blog)

Reflection on reading (Adobe Illustrator (Blog))

Advertisements

Time Design: ART119- Spring 2016

Time Design relies on a few key elements: recurrence, subjectivity, intensity, and scope.

 

Scope: The range of actions or viewpoints within a given moment, and, conceptually, the range of ideas one’s mind can grasp.

FullSizeRender

This single-panel sketch compacts an efficient narrative: We see a toaster oven, still plugged in, and a grave site next to the counter where toast never materialized.

Subjectivity: Depicting a subject experiencing the passage of time through emotion, action, or movement.

Scan 2Scan 1Scan

In this three-panel sketch, we see Subjectivity at work, with intensification. The subject is seen waiting in the first pane, and then a stylization of toast as a clock signifies a passage of time (to reinforce/intensify the wristwatch from the first pane), and then in the final panel, we see a skull with attached cobwebs. This peak intensity, coupled with a toaster that still hasn’t produced toast, exaggerates the feeling of waiting – literally forever.

Intensity: Sequential exaggeration of particular attributes within a series of images.

0328162004_hdr0328162004b_hdr0328162005_hdr0328162005a_hdrIn this final sequence, a four-panel sketch, we see a similar use of intensification. The subject ages, and dies. The toast materializes only after the subject has passed.

Shape Study – Winter 2016

MGeiger_Shape_03_W16

Radial Symmetry Study. Construction Paper on Mounting Board. 14″  x  14″.

MGeiger_Shape_02_W16

Bilateral Symmetry Study with Organic Shapes. Construction Paper on Mounting Board. 14″  x  12″.

MGeiger_Shape_01_W16

Balanced Asymmetry Study with Organic and Geometric Shapes. Construction Paper on Mounting Board. 14″  x  12″.

 

Transparency – Winter 2016

Color Study. Color Aid Paper on Bristol. Illusion of transparency by color selection.

MGeiger_AdditiveSubtractive_01_W16

Color Study. Color Aid Paper on Bristol. Illusion of transparency by subtractive and additive color selection.

MGeiger_Transparency_03_W16

Color Study. Acrylic Paint on Bristol. Illusion of transparency and depth by gradient color progression.